Thursday , December 13 2018
Home / Tag Archives: ACL

Tag Archives: ACL

ACL in traffic policy on Huawei device

We have to remember that traffic policy consists of 3 parts:

  • Classifier
  • Behavior
  • Traffic-policy

In brief, to configure a traffic policy:

  • define traffic class
  • define action to be applied to the traffic class
  • associate traffic classifiers and behaviors
  • apply the traffic policy to an interface.

Let’s start from ACL.

We have possibility to configure many rules in an ACL. If the ACL is specified in if-match clause, then a packet is matched against multiple rules. If the packet matches a rule in the ACL, then it stops checking against the next rules.

  • In a case of DENY action in the ACL, the matched packet is denied, regardless of what traffic behavior defines.
  • When PERMIT action is defined in the ACL, then traffic behavior is applied to the matched packet.

Read More »

ACL matching order on Huawei device

The first what a device has to do is to check if the ACL exists. If it does, the device matches packets against rules, according to the rule ID. We can configure rule IDs manually or they are automatically allocated. In case of automatically allocated rules, there is a certain space between two rule IDs. The size of the space depends on ACL step. By default it is 5 but we can change it by command. In this manner, we can add a rule before the first rule or between rules. ACL rules are displayed in ascending order of rule IDs, not in the order of configuration.

ACL rules can be arranged in two modes: configuration and auto.

In the configuration mode (default mode), we decide which rule should be first, which second and so on and so forth. In this mode, the device matches rules in ascending order of rule IDs. Anytime we can configure an additional rule with smaller rule ID. In such case, later configured rule may be matched earlier. We make such a decision, not the system.

In the auto mode, unlike in the configuration mode, the system automatically allocates rule IDs. We don’t have possibility to specify rule ID. The most precise rule is placed at the beginning of ACL.

When can we use it?

Read More »

traffic policy on Huawei router

That was to be expected. Poland is out of Euro Cup. The only thing we can do is to come back to the real world :).

Today I will show you how to use ACLs and traffic policies for packets’ lost troubleshooting in a network.

Huawei ACL and traffic policy configuration

Let’s assume that we have such topology:

What we have to do is to check end-to-end connectivity between CE and R2 Loopback100 interface, to find where packets are being lost.

Read More »

ACL and PBR on Huawei CX600

Access Control List ACL

There are five types of ACLs on Huawei devices. Taking CX600 into consideration there are:

  1. Basic ACL (number ranges from 2000 to 2999) classifies packets based on a source address
  2. Advanced ACL (number ranges from 3000 to 3999) source address, destination address, source port number, destination port number, and protocol type
  3. Interface-based ACL (number ranges from 1000 to 1999) classifies packets based on the interface from which the packets are received
  4. Ethernet Frame Header ACL (number ranges from 4000 to 4099) classifies packets based on source and destination MAC addresses
  5. User ACL (number ranges from 6000 to 9999) classifies packets based on user groups.

The rules order depends on rule ID and rule matching order. There are two matching orders:

  • Configuration order – ACL rules are matched based on their configuration order. Rules IDs can be configured by user or generated by system automatically according to ACL step. By default the system generates 5 as the first rule ID. So the next rule ID will be 10, 15 and so on. Anytime you can configure rule ID manually, for example rule 1 and this rule will be placed before 5. You do not have to delete the whole ACL. Each time you can delete a specific rule without deleting the whole ACL.
  • Automatic order – the most precise rule is taking as the first. This is implemented through the comparison of wildcard masks. The system assigns rule IDs automatically.

Read More »